Why You Should Train with the Rogue Anvil Grip

The Rogue Anvil Grip is an excellent way to build a super strong, vice like grip.

The Rogue Anvil Grip

Rogue Anvil Grip is a solid steel, cone-shaped grip implement machined and assembled at Rogue HQ in Columbus, Ohio.

©Rogue

Measuring 13.5” in length from the top of the cone to the eye-bolt at its base, this tool can be used in conjunction with a simple carabiner and loading pin to attach a desired weight load for a customized workout. The compatible 12” Rogue Loading Pin is sold separately.

The base of the Rogue Anvil Grip measures 3” across, with a tapered design ending in a 0.75” diameter at the top.

It weighs 12.33 LBS unloaded (17.58 LBS with a loading pin), and is available in your choice of two finishes: Raw (Bare Steel)* or Black Oxide.

Both versions include engraved Rogue branding in the base.

Rogue Anvil Grip and athlete
©Rogue

They designed the Rogue Anvil Grip as an homage to one of the oldest grip training tests on record, as generations of Strongmen have attempted to lift traditional blacksmith’s anvils—usually by the horn-shaped end—as an ultimate feat of strength.

Even today, anvil lifting is still attempted by some of the world’s best, with the tapered horn presenting a particular challenge re-created in this new grip training tool.

Rogue Anvil Grip Upkeep

Please Note: Like any fine piece of machined steel, the raw / bare steel version of the Rogue Anvil Grip will require some upkeep.

Rogue anvil grip in gym
©Rogue

Occasionally brushing down the implement with 3-in-1 oil or WD-40 can create a beautiful patina look.

Rogue Anvil Grip Specifications

  • Made in the USA
  • Machined from a Solid Piece of Steel
  • Weight (Unloaded): 12.33 LBS
  • Length: 11” (Anvil itself), 13.5” (Anvil + Eye Bolt)
  • Tapered Cone-Shape design: 3” dia. at base, 0.75” dia. at top
  • Eye Bolt at base for attaching weight via loading pin (pin sold separately)
  • Engraved Rogue branding
  • Finish Options: Bare Steel or Black Oxide

Benefits of a Strong Grip

A strong grip is extremely important for many reasons.

We’ll discuss how a strong grip improves hand strength and even reduces back pain.

Improves Hand Strength

The grip strength of a person is an important factor in hand health. In fact, it can be used as a good indicator of overall health.

When someone has weak or impaired hand strength, it can affect their ability to perform daily tasks like preparing meals and dressing themselves.

It also may impact their ability to participate in activities such as sports that require gripping with both hands or pulling an object.

Learn the Pull Up

Prevents Back and Shoulder Pain by Strengthening Your Forearms

Your forearm muscles are important for the health of your shoulders and back, as they help to stabilize the joints that connect those two parts of your body.

The connection between your shoulder and spine is called the shoulder girdle, which consists of four bones: clavicle (collarbone), scapula (shoulder blade), humerus (upper arm bone), and ulna and radius (lower arm bones).

©Rogue

The elbow joint connects the forearm with the upper arm through another set of seven bones: humerus, radius, ulna, carpals (wrist bones), metacarpals (palm side wrist bones) phalanges (fingers).

The wrist joint is composed of eight small carpal bones that meet up with five metacarpals from your hand to form a structure that allows you to bend your fingers forward or backward at their base.

Reduces Risk of Injury

Grip strength is an indicator of overall muscle strength and a good predictor of mortality risk. In other words, if you can’t hold on tightly, you are more likely to get injured—and that could lead to death.

The link between grip strength and overall health is so strong that it has been called the “grip test.”

A study performed by scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found that grip strength can be used as a predictor for overall health and mortality rates.

©Rogue

When participants were tested for their grip strength, they were also measured for body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, blood pressure and other important health factors like cholesterol levels.

The results showed that people who had lower than average grip strength had higher risk factors for heart disease than those with stronger grips did—even though both groups were normal weight but only one was healthy!

Rogue Barbells
Rogue Adjustable Dumbbells
Rogue Pull Up Bars

Conclusion

In summary, improving your grip strength is an easy way to improve your overall health and well-being.

©Rogue

It can help to reduce the risk of injury and prevent back pain, boost your immune system strength as well as improve mental health and even moods!

So, if you want to achieve those goals then get started on improving those hands today!